Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.

We examined controls on mineralization of carbon to methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in Sphagnum (moss)-dominated peatland ecosystems by transplanting surface (5 cm deep) and subsurface (40 cm deep) pear samples reciprocally among three sites for periods ranging from 4 to 25 months. The sires were Big Run Bog in West Virginia, USA, Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota, USA, and Bog 307 in Ontario, Canada. Immediately upon retrieval, we incubated the peat samples in the laboratory at 12 and 22 degrees C under both anoxic and oxic conditions to estimate rates of carbon mineralization. Transplanting affected surface pear more than subsurface peat. Pear incubated within Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota had the highest rates of CH4 production, regardless of origin, whereas transplanting did not affect rates of CO2 production measured concomitantly Pent that originated in Big Rim Bog in West virginia generally maintained higher rates of CH4 production and CO2 production than peat from the other two Sites after incubation in the field. The temperature dependence (Q(10)) of CH4 production and CO2 production varied among transplant sites, but not among pear origins, suggesting physiological adaptations of microbial communities to local environmental conditions. Differences in organic matter quality of the pear, particularly lignin chemistry, helped explain the results: (a) CH4 production con-elated with fresher lignin derived from Carex sedges, and (b) CO2 production correlated with woody lignin. We concluded that, although both sire conditions (climate, nutrient status, and microbial communities) and organic matter quality influence carbon mineralization in pear, interactive effects occur. and may differ depending on pear temperature. Moreover, CH4 production and CO2 production respond differently to environmental regulators.

Main Author: Yavitt, Joseph.
Other Authors: Williams, Christopher., Wieder, R Kelman.
Language: English
Published: 1999
Online Access: http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:179264
PID vudl:179264
id vudl:179264
modeltype_str_mv vudl-system:CoreModel
vudl-system:CollectionModel
vudl-system:ResourceCollection
datastream_str_mv DC
PARENT-QUERY
PARENT-LIST-RAW
PARENT-LIST
MEMBER-QUERY
MEMBER-LIST-RAW
LEGACY-METS
LICENSE
AGENTS
PROCESS-MD
THUMBNAIL
STRUCTMAP
RELS-EXT
hierarchytype
sequence_vudl_179230_str 0000000012
has_order_str no
hierarchy_top_id vudl:171664
hierarchy_top_title Villanova Digital Collection
hierarchy_parent_id vudl:179230
hierarchy_parent_title Wieder R Kelman
hierarchy_sequence 0000000012
hierarchy_first_parent_id_str vudl:179264
hierarchy_sequence_sort_str 0000000012
hierarchy_all_parents_str_mv vudl:171664
vudl:172968
vudl:179230
first_indexed 2014-01-11T22:45:08Z
last_indexed 2014-01-11T22:45:08Z
recordtype vudl
fullrecord <root> <url> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:179264/DC </url> <thumbnail> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:179264/THUMBNAIL </thumbnail> </root>
spelling
institution Villanova University
collection Digital Library
language English
dc_source_str_mv Geomicrobiology 17(1), January 2000, 61-80.
author Yavitt, Joseph.
author_s Yavitt, Joseph.
spellingShingle Yavitt, Joseph.
Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
author-letter Yavitt, Joseph.
author_sort_str Yavitt, Joseph.
author2 Williams, Christopher.
Wieder, R Kelman.
author2Str Williams, Christopher.
Wieder, R Kelman.
dc_title_str Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title_short Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title_full Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title_fullStr Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title_full_unstemmed Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
collection_title_sort_str controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
title_sort controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
description We examined controls on mineralization of carbon to methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in Sphagnum (moss)-dominated peatland ecosystems by transplanting surface (5 cm deep) and subsurface (40 cm deep) pear samples reciprocally among three sites for periods ranging from 4 to 25 months. The sires were Big Run Bog in West Virginia, USA, Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota, USA, and Bog 307 in Ontario, Canada. Immediately upon retrieval, we incubated the peat samples in the laboratory at 12 and 22 degrees C under both anoxic and oxic conditions to estimate rates of carbon mineralization. Transplanting affected surface pear more than subsurface peat. Pear incubated within Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota had the highest rates of CH4 production, regardless of origin, whereas transplanting did not affect rates of CO2 production measured concomitantly Pent that originated in Big Rim Bog in West virginia generally maintained higher rates of CH4 production and CO2 production than peat from the other two Sites after incubation in the field. The temperature dependence (Q(10)) of CH4 production and CO2 production varied among transplant sites, but not among pear origins, suggesting physiological adaptations of microbial communities to local environmental conditions. Differences in organic matter quality of the pear, particularly lignin chemistry, helped explain the results: (a) CH4 production con-elated with fresher lignin derived from Carex sedges, and (b) CO2 production correlated with woody lignin. We concluded that, although both sire conditions (climate, nutrient status, and microbial communities) and organic matter quality influence carbon mineralization in pear, interactive effects occur. and may differ depending on pear temperature. Moreover, CH4 production and CO2 production respond differently to environmental regulators.
publishDate 1999
normalized_sort_date 1999-01-01T00:00:00Z
dc_date_str 1999
license_str protected
REPOSITORYNAME FgsRepos
REPOSBASEURL http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora
fgs.state Active
fgs.label Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
fgs.ownerId diglibEditor
fgs.createdDate 2013-01-22T12:46:36.130Z
fgs.lastModifiedDate 2013-12-05T17:07:25.607Z
dc.title Controls on microbial production of methane and carbon dioxide in three Sphagnum-dominated peatland ecosystems as revealed by a reciprocal field peat transplant experiment.
dc.creator Yavitt, Joseph.
Williams, Christopher.
Wieder, R Kelman.
dc.description We examined controls on mineralization of carbon to methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in Sphagnum (moss)-dominated peatland ecosystems by transplanting surface (5 cm deep) and subsurface (40 cm deep) pear samples reciprocally among three sites for periods ranging from 4 to 25 months. The sires were Big Run Bog in West Virginia, USA, Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota, USA, and Bog 307 in Ontario, Canada. Immediately upon retrieval, we incubated the peat samples in the laboratory at 12 and 22 degrees C under both anoxic and oxic conditions to estimate rates of carbon mineralization. Transplanting affected surface pear more than subsurface peat. Pear incubated within Bog Lake Bog in Minnesota had the highest rates of CH4 production, regardless of origin, whereas transplanting did not affect rates of CO2 production measured concomitantly Pent that originated in Big Rim Bog in West virginia generally maintained higher rates of CH4 production and CO2 production than peat from the other two Sites after incubation in the field. The temperature dependence (Q(10)) of CH4 production and CO2 production varied among transplant sites, but not among pear origins, suggesting physiological adaptations of microbial communities to local environmental conditions. Differences in organic matter quality of the pear, particularly lignin chemistry, helped explain the results: (a) CH4 production con-elated with fresher lignin derived from Carex sedges, and (b) CO2 production correlated with woody lignin. We concluded that, although both sire conditions (climate, nutrient status, and microbial communities) and organic matter quality influence carbon mineralization in pear, interactive effects occur. and may differ depending on pear temperature. Moreover, CH4 production and CO2 production respond differently to environmental regulators.
dc.date 1999
dc.identifier vudl:179264
dc.source Geomicrobiology 17(1), January 2000, 61-80.
dc.language en
license.mdRef http://digital.library.villanova.edu/copyright.html
agent.name Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University
klk
has_thumbnail true
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_type MD5
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_digest 203c69e18f4f46c81e9892448d2c07cd
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_type INTERNAL_ID
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_ref http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora/get/vudl:179264/THUMBNAIL/2013-01-22T12:46:38.001Z
relsext.hasModel info:fedora/vudl-system:CoreModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:CollectionModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:ResourceCollection
relsext.itemID oai:digital.library.villanova.edu:vudl:179264
relsext.isMemberOf info:fedora/vudl:179230
relsext.hasLegacyURL http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Villanova%20Digital%20Collection/Faculty%20Fulltext/Wieder%20R%20Kelman/WiederRKelman-65cf2f95-3ab9-4b6f-9992-026f48bdaea7.xml
relsext.sortOn title
relsext.sequence vudl:179230#12
_version_ 1504171253708095488
score 13.6423855
subpages