Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.

Sympatric speciation is often proposed to account for species-rich adaptive radiations within lakes or islands, where barriers to gene flow or dispersal may be lacking. However, allopatric speciation may also occur in such situations, especially when ranges are fragmented by fluctuating water levels. We test the hypothesis that Miocene fragmentation of Cuba into three palaeo-archipelagos accompanied species-level divergence in the adaptive radiation of West Indian Anolis lizards. Analysis of morphology, mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) and nuclear DNA in the Cuban green anoles (carolinensis subgroup) strongly supports three predictions made by this hypothesis. First, three geographical sets of populations, whose ranges correspond with palaeo-archipelago boundaries, are distinct and warrant recognition as independent evolutionary lineages or species. Coalescence of nuclear sequence fragments sampled from these species and the large divergences observed between their mtDNA haplotypes suggest separation prior to the subsequent unification of Cuba ca. 5 Myr ago. Second, molecular phylogenetic relationships among these species reflect historical geographical relationships rather than morphological similarity. Third, all three species remain distinct despite extensive geographical contact subsequent to island unification, occasional hybridization and introgression of mtDNA haplotypes. Allopatric speciation initiated during partial island submergence may play an important role in speciation during the adaptive radiation of Anolis lizards.

Main Author: Glor, Richard.
Other Authors: Gifford, Matthew., Larson, Allan., Losos, Jonathan., Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez., Lara, Ada., Jackman, Todd.
Language: English
Published: 2004
Online Access: http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:177324
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dc_source_str_mv Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 271, 2004, 2257-2265.
author Glor, Richard.
author_facet_str_mv Glor, Richard.
Gifford, Matthew.
Larson, Allan.
Losos, Jonathan.
Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez.
Lara, Ada.
Jackman, Todd.
author_or_contributor_facet_str_mv Glor, Richard.
Gifford, Matthew.
Larson, Allan.
Losos, Jonathan.
Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez.
Lara, Ada.
Jackman, Todd.
author_s Glor, Richard.
spellingShingle Glor, Richard.
Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
author-letter Glor, Richard.
author_sort_str Glor, Richard.
author2 Gifford, Matthew.
Larson, Allan.
Losos, Jonathan.
Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez.
Lara, Ada.
Jackman, Todd.
author2Str Gifford, Matthew.
Larson, Allan.
Losos, Jonathan.
Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez.
Lara, Ada.
Jackman, Todd.
dc_title_str Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
title Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
title_short Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
title_full Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
title_fullStr Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
title_full_unstemmed Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
collection_title_sort_str partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the cuban green anoles.
title_sort partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the cuban green anoles.
description Sympatric speciation is often proposed to account for species-rich adaptive radiations within lakes or islands, where barriers to gene flow or dispersal may be lacking. However, allopatric speciation may also occur in such situations, especially when ranges are fragmented by fluctuating water levels. We test the hypothesis that Miocene fragmentation of Cuba into three palaeo-archipelagos accompanied species-level divergence in the adaptive radiation of West Indian Anolis lizards. Analysis of morphology, mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) and nuclear DNA in the Cuban green anoles (carolinensis subgroup) strongly supports three predictions made by this hypothesis. First, three geographical sets of populations, whose ranges correspond with palaeo-archipelago boundaries, are distinct and warrant recognition as independent evolutionary lineages or species. Coalescence of nuclear sequence fragments sampled from these species and the large divergences observed between their mtDNA haplotypes suggest separation prior to the subsequent unification of Cuba ca. 5 Myr ago. Second, molecular phylogenetic relationships among these species reflect historical geographical relationships rather than morphological similarity. Third, all three species remain distinct despite extensive geographical contact subsequent to island unification, occasional hybridization and introgression of mtDNA haplotypes. Allopatric speciation initiated during partial island submergence may play an important role in speciation during the adaptive radiation of Anolis lizards.
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fgs.label Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
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dc.title Partial island submergence and speciation in an adaptive radiation: a multilocus analysis of the Cuban green anoles.
dc.creator Glor, Richard.
Gifford, Matthew.
Larson, Allan.
Losos, Jonathan.
Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez.
Lara, Ada.
Jackman, Todd.
dc.description Sympatric speciation is often proposed to account for species-rich adaptive radiations within lakes or islands, where barriers to gene flow or dispersal may be lacking. However, allopatric speciation may also occur in such situations, especially when ranges are fragmented by fluctuating water levels. We test the hypothesis that Miocene fragmentation of Cuba into three palaeo-archipelagos accompanied species-level divergence in the adaptive radiation of West Indian Anolis lizards. Analysis of morphology, mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) and nuclear DNA in the Cuban green anoles (carolinensis subgroup) strongly supports three predictions made by this hypothesis. First, three geographical sets of populations, whose ranges correspond with palaeo-archipelago boundaries, are distinct and warrant recognition as independent evolutionary lineages or species. Coalescence of nuclear sequence fragments sampled from these species and the large divergences observed between their mtDNA haplotypes suggest separation prior to the subsequent unification of Cuba ca. 5 Myr ago. Second, molecular phylogenetic relationships among these species reflect historical geographical relationships rather than morphological similarity. Third, all three species remain distinct despite extensive geographical contact subsequent to island unification, occasional hybridization and introgression of mtDNA haplotypes. Allopatric speciation initiated during partial island submergence may play an important role in speciation during the adaptive radiation of Anolis lizards.
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