Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.

The subculture of violence thesis suggests that African Americans are disproportionately likely to respond to minor transgressions with lethal force because of a culturally defined need to protect one’s reputation and a normative aversion to legal forms of dispute resolution. Using data on over 950 non-justifiable homicides from police files, the present study tests this hypothesis by examining race-specific patterns of victim precipitation (i.e., the victim’s role in initiating the homicide). If, as the theory suggests, African Americans are more likely to respond to minor affronts with lethal violence than Whites, then African American homicide incidents should have more victim precipitation, particularly in the form of minor acts of provocation. The results of the current analysis do not support this hypothesis and therefore are inconsistent with the notion that a unique subculture of violence among African Americans explains their disproportionately high levels of homicide victimization and offending.

Main Author: Hannon, Lance.
Format: Villanova Faculty Authorship
Language: English
Published: 2003
Online Access: http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:176708
PID vudl:176708
id vudl:176708
modeltype_str_mv vudl-system:CoreModel
vudl-system:CollectionModel
vudl-system:ResourceCollection
datastream_str_mv DC
PARENT-QUERY
PARENT-LIST-RAW
PARENT-LIST
MEMBER-QUERY
MEMBER-LIST-RAW
LEGACY-METS
LICENSE
AGENTS
PROCESS-MD
THUMBNAIL
STRUCTMAP
RELS-EXT
hierarchytype
sequence_vudl_176692_str 0000000006
has_order_str no
hierarchy_top_id vudl:641262
hierarchy_top_title Villanova faculty author
hierarchy_parent_id vudl:176692
hierarchy_parent_title Hannon Lance
hierarchy_sequence 0000000006
hierarchy_first_parent_id_str vudl:176708
hierarchy_sequence_sort_str 0000000006
hierarchy_all_parents_str_mv vudl:641262
vudl:172968
vudl:176692
first_indexed 2014-01-11T22:53:17Z
last_indexed 2021-04-12T19:29:30Z
recordtype vudl
fullrecord <root> <url> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:176708/DC </url> <thumbnail> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:176708/THUMBNAIL </thumbnail> </root>
spelling
institution Villanova University
collection Digital Library
language English
dc_source_str_mv The Social Science Journal 41, 2004, 115-121.
author Hannon, Lance.
author_facet_str_mv Hannon, Lance.
author_or_contributor_facet_str_mv Hannon, Lance.
author_s Hannon, Lance.
spellingShingle Hannon, Lance.
Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
author-letter Hannon, Lance.
author_sort_str Hannon, Lance.
dc_title_str Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title_short Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title_full Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title_fullStr Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title_full_unstemmed Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
collection_title_sort_str race, victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
title_sort race, victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
format Villanova Faculty Authorship
description The subculture of violence thesis suggests that African Americans are disproportionately likely to respond to minor transgressions with lethal force because of a culturally defined need to protect one’s reputation and a normative aversion to legal forms of dispute resolution. Using data on over 950 non-justifiable homicides from police files, the present study tests this hypothesis by examining race-specific patterns of victim precipitation (i.e., the victim’s role in initiating the homicide). If, as the theory suggests, African Americans are more likely to respond to minor affronts with lethal violence than Whites, then African American homicide incidents should have more victim precipitation, particularly in the form of minor acts of provocation. The results of the current analysis do not support this hypothesis and therefore are inconsistent with the notion that a unique subculture of violence among African Americans explains their disproportionately high levels of homicide victimization and offending.
publishDate 2003
normalized_sort_date 2003-01-01T00:00:00Z
dc_date_str 2003
license_str protected
REPOSITORYNAME FgsRepos
REPOSBASEURL http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora
fgs.state Active
fgs.label Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
fgs.ownerId diglibEditor
fgs.createdDate 2013-01-22T05:51:04.937Z
fgs.lastModifiedDate 2021-04-12T19:07:24.463Z
dc.title Race, Victim precipitated homicide, and the subculture of violence thesis.
dc.creator Hannon, Lance.
dc.description The subculture of violence thesis suggests that African Americans are disproportionately likely to respond to minor transgressions with lethal force because of a culturally defined need to protect one’s reputation and a normative aversion to legal forms of dispute resolution. Using data on over 950 non-justifiable homicides from police files, the present study tests this hypothesis by examining race-specific patterns of victim precipitation (i.e., the victim’s role in initiating the homicide). If, as the theory suggests, African Americans are more likely to respond to minor affronts with lethal violence than Whites, then African American homicide incidents should have more victim precipitation, particularly in the form of minor acts of provocation. The results of the current analysis do not support this hypothesis and therefore are inconsistent with the notion that a unique subculture of violence among African Americans explains their disproportionately high levels of homicide victimization and offending.
dc.date 2003
dc.format Villanova Faculty Authorship
dc.identifier vudl:176708
dc.source The Social Science Journal 41, 2004, 115-121.
dc.language en
license.mdRef http://digital.library.villanova.edu/copyright.html
agent.name Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University
KHL
has_thumbnail true
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_type MD5
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_digest 203c69e18f4f46c81e9892448d2c07cd
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_type INTERNAL_ID
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_ref http://hades-vm.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora/get/vudl:176708/THUMBNAIL/2013-01-22T05:51:06.904Z
relsext.hasModel info:fedora/vudl-system:CoreModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:CollectionModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:ResourceCollection
relsext.itemID oai:digital.library.villanova.edu:vudl:176708
relsext.isMemberOf info:fedora/vudl:176692
relsext.hasLegacyURL http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Villanova%20Digital%20Collection/Faculty%20Fulltext/Hannon%20Lance/HannonLance-25d677d9-262e-43ea-81bb-2e7cad8fc497.xml
relsext.sortOn title
relsext.sequence vudl:176692#6
_version_ 1696864163896229888
score 13.990641
subpages