Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.

1. It is generally assumed that the same factors drive the decomposition of both litter and roots and that nutrient release from litter and roots is synchronized. However, few studies have explicitly tested these assumptions, and no studies have examined whether plant genetics (i.e. plant susceptibility to herbivory) could affect these relationships. 2. Here we examine the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle and fine root litter decomposition of piñon pine, Pinus edulis. The study population consists of individual trees that are either susceptible or resistant to herbivory by the piñon needle scale, Matsucoccus acalyptus, or the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella. Genetic analyses and long-term experimental removals and additions of these insects to individual trees have identified trees that are naturally resistant or susceptible to M. acalyptus and D. albovittella. In addition, these herbivores increase litter chemical quality and alter soil microclimate, both of which mediate decomposition in ecosystems. 3. The effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle litter mass and phosphorus (P) loss, when significant, are largely mediated by herbivore-induced changes to microclimate. But the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on root litter nitrogen (N) and P retention, and needle litter N retention, are largely governed by herbivore-induced changes to litter chemical quality. Whether a particular tree was resistant or susceptible to herbivores exerted a large influence on net nutrient release, but the direction of herbivore influence varied temporally. 4. The controls on decomposition vary between herbivore-susceptible and herbivoreresistant phenotypes. This suggests that understanding decomposition and nutrient retention in some ecosystems may require considering the effects of herbivores on aboveand below-ground processes and how these effects may be governed by plant genetics. 5. Synthesis. Because so few studies have attempted to quantify genetic components of ecosystem processes, the integration of ecosystem ecology with population genetics has the potential to place ecosystem science within a genetic and evolutionary framework. Using field trials of known genetic composition, ecosystem scientists may use quantitative genetics techniques to explore ecosystem traits just as population geneticists have used these techniques to explore traditional traits such as resistance to insects.

Main Author: Classen, Aimee T.
Other Authors: Chapman, Samantha K., Whitham, Thomas G., Hart, Stephen C., Koch, George W.
Language: English
Published: 2007
Online Access: http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:175392
PID vudl:175392
id vudl:175392
modeltype_str_mv vudl-system:CoreModel
vudl-system:CollectionModel
vudl-system:ResourceCollection
datastream_str_mv DC
PARENT-QUERY
PARENT-LIST-RAW
PARENT-LIST
MEMBER-QUERY
MEMBER-LIST-RAW
LEGACY-METS
LICENSE
AGENTS
PROCESS-MD
THUMBNAIL
STRUCTMAP
RELS-EXT
hierarchytype
sequence_vudl_175385_str 0000000003
has_order_str no
hierarchy_top_id vudl:171664
hierarchy_top_title Villanova Digital Collection
hierarchy_parent_id vudl:175385
hierarchy_parent_title Chapman Samantha
hierarchy_sequence 0000000003
hierarchy_first_parent_id_str vudl:175392
hierarchy_sequence_sort_str 0000000003
hierarchy_all_parents_str_mv vudl:175385
vudl:172968
vudl:171664
first_indexed 2014-01-11T22:40:32Z
last_indexed 2014-01-11T22:40:32Z
recordtype vudl
fullrecord <root> <url> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:175392/DC </url> <thumbnail> http://digital.library.villanova.edu/files/vudl:175392/THUMBNAIL </thumbnail> </root>
spelling
institution Villanova University
collection Digital Library
language English
dc_source_str_mv Journal of Ecology 95, 2007, 1181-1194.
author Classen, Aimee T.
author_facet_str_mv Classen, Aimee T.
Chapman, Samantha K.
Whitham, Thomas G.
Hart, Stephen C.
Koch, George W.
author_or_contributor_facet_str_mv Classen, Aimee T.
Chapman, Samantha K.
Whitham, Thomas G.
Hart, Stephen C.
Koch, George W.
author_s Classen, Aimee T.
spellingShingle Classen, Aimee T.
Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
author-letter Classen, Aimee T.
author_sort_str Classen, Aimee T.
author2 Chapman, Samantha K.
Whitham, Thomas G.
Hart, Stephen C.
Koch, George W.
author2Str Chapman, Samantha K.
Whitham, Thomas G.
Hart, Stephen C.
Koch, George W.
dc_title_str Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title_short Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title_full Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title_fullStr Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title_full_unstemmed Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
collection_title_sort_str genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
title_sort genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
description 1. It is generally assumed that the same factors drive the decomposition of both litter and roots and that nutrient release from litter and roots is synchronized. However, few studies have explicitly tested these assumptions, and no studies have examined whether plant genetics (i.e. plant susceptibility to herbivory) could affect these relationships. 2. Here we examine the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle and fine root litter decomposition of piñon pine, Pinus edulis. The study population consists of individual trees that are either susceptible or resistant to herbivory by the piñon needle scale, Matsucoccus acalyptus, or the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella. Genetic analyses and long-term experimental removals and additions of these insects to individual trees have identified trees that are naturally resistant or susceptible to M. acalyptus and D. albovittella. In addition, these herbivores increase litter chemical quality and alter soil microclimate, both of which mediate decomposition in ecosystems. 3. The effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle litter mass and phosphorus (P) loss, when significant, are largely mediated by herbivore-induced changes to microclimate. But the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on root litter nitrogen (N) and P retention, and needle litter N retention, are largely governed by herbivore-induced changes to litter chemical quality. Whether a particular tree was resistant or susceptible to herbivores exerted a large influence on net nutrient release, but the direction of herbivore influence varied temporally. 4. The controls on decomposition vary between herbivore-susceptible and herbivoreresistant phenotypes. This suggests that understanding decomposition and nutrient retention in some ecosystems may require considering the effects of herbivores on aboveand below-ground processes and how these effects may be governed by plant genetics. 5. Synthesis. Because so few studies have attempted to quantify genetic components of ecosystem processes, the integration of ecosystem ecology with population genetics has the potential to place ecosystem science within a genetic and evolutionary framework. Using field trials of known genetic composition, ecosystem scientists may use quantitative genetics techniques to explore ecosystem traits just as population geneticists have used these techniques to explore traditional traits such as resistance to insects.
publishDate 2007
normalized_sort_date 2007-01-01T00:00:00Z
dc_date_str 2007
license_str protected
REPOSITORYNAME FgsRepos
REPOSBASEURL http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora
fgs.state Active
fgs.label Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
fgs.ownerId diglibEditor
fgs.createdDate 2013-01-22T04:39:08.843Z
fgs.lastModifiedDate 2013-12-05T17:07:08.234Z
dc.title Genetic-based plant resistance and susceptibility traits to herbivory influence needle and root litter nutrient dynamics.
dc.creator Classen, Aimee T.
Chapman, Samantha K.
Whitham, Thomas G.
Hart, Stephen C.
Koch, George W.
dc.description 1. It is generally assumed that the same factors drive the decomposition of both litter and roots and that nutrient release from litter and roots is synchronized. However, few studies have explicitly tested these assumptions, and no studies have examined whether plant genetics (i.e. plant susceptibility to herbivory) could affect these relationships. 2. Here we examine the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle and fine root litter decomposition of piñon pine, Pinus edulis. The study population consists of individual trees that are either susceptible or resistant to herbivory by the piñon needle scale, Matsucoccus acalyptus, or the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella. Genetic analyses and long-term experimental removals and additions of these insects to individual trees have identified trees that are naturally resistant or susceptible to M. acalyptus and D. albovittella. In addition, these herbivores increase litter chemical quality and alter soil microclimate, both of which mediate decomposition in ecosystems. 3. The effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle litter mass and phosphorus (P) loss, when significant, are largely mediated by herbivore-induced changes to microclimate. But the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on root litter nitrogen (N) and P retention, and needle litter N retention, are largely governed by herbivore-induced changes to litter chemical quality. Whether a particular tree was resistant or susceptible to herbivores exerted a large influence on net nutrient release, but the direction of herbivore influence varied temporally. 4. The controls on decomposition vary between herbivore-susceptible and herbivoreresistant phenotypes. This suggests that understanding decomposition and nutrient retention in some ecosystems may require considering the effects of herbivores on aboveand below-ground processes and how these effects may be governed by plant genetics. 5. Synthesis. Because so few studies have attempted to quantify genetic components of ecosystem processes, the integration of ecosystem ecology with population genetics has the potential to place ecosystem science within a genetic and evolutionary framework. Using field trials of known genetic composition, ecosystem scientists may use quantitative genetics techniques to explore ecosystem traits just as population geneticists have used these techniques to explore traditional traits such as resistance to insects.
dc.date 2007
dc.identifier vudl:175392
dc.source Journal of Ecology 95, 2007, 1181-1194.
dc.language en
license.mdRef http://digital.library.villanova.edu/copyright.html
agent.name Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University
AAD
has_thumbnail true
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_type MD5
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_digest 203c69e18f4f46c81e9892448d2c07cd
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_type INTERNAL_ID
THUMBNAIL_contentLocation_ref http://hades-vm.library.villanova.edu:8088/fedora/get/vudl:175392/THUMBNAIL/2013-01-22T04:39:10.954Z
relsext.hasModel info:fedora/vudl-system:CoreModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:CollectionModel
info:fedora/vudl-system:ResourceCollection
relsext.itemID oai:digital.library.villanova.edu:vudl:175392
relsext.isMemberOf info:fedora/vudl:175385
relsext.hasLegacyURL http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Villanova%20Digital%20Collection/Faculty%20Fulltext/Chapman%20Samantha/ChapmanSamantha-5bb19de4-a119-4d6b-be6a-c6d8576bb8c8.xml
relsext.sortOn title
relsext.sequence vudl:175385#3
_version_ 1644304411817672704
score 13.671653
subpages