Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.

Food and non-food plant characteristics were studied for the geometric tortoise, Psammobates geometricus, to test the hypothesis that feeding preferences in tortoises may be influenced by the mechanical properties of plant leaves. Twelve focal feeding observations made between 8 October and 31 Octob...

Full description

Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Balsamo, Ronald., Hofmeyr, Margaretha., Henen, Brian., Bauer, Aaron.
Format: Villanova Faculty Authorship
Language:English
Published: 2003
Online Access:http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?url=https://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:173961
id vudl:173961
record_format vudl
institution Villanova University
collection Digital Library
modeltype_str_mv vudl-system:CollectionModel
vudl-system:CoreModel
vudl-system:ResourceCollection
datastream_str_mv LEGACY-METS
LICENSE
AUDIT
RELS-EXT
PROCESS-MD
THUMBNAIL
MEMBER-QUERY
DC
STRUCTMAP
PARENT-QUERY
MEMBER-LIST-RAW
PARENT-LIST
PARENT-LIST-RAW
AGENTS
hierarchytype
hierarchy_all_parents_str_mv vudl:173930
vudl:172968
vudl:641262
vudl:3
vudl:1
sequence_vudl_173930_str 0000000011
hierarchy_top_id vudl:641262
hierarchy_top_title Villanova Faculty Publications
fedora_parent_id_str_mv vudl:173930
hierarchy_first_parent_id_str vudl:173961
hierarchy_parent_id vudl:173930
hierarchy_parent_title Balsamo Ronald
hierarchy_sequence_sort_str 0000000011
hierarchy_sequence 0000000011
spelling Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
Balsamo, Ronald.
Hofmeyr, Margaretha.
Henen, Brian.
Bauer, Aaron.
Food and non-food plant characteristics were studied for the geometric tortoise, Psammobates geometricus, to test the hypothesis that feeding preferences in tortoises may be influenced by the mechanical properties of plant leaves. Twelve focal feeding observations made between 8 October and 31 October 2002 were synthesized with literature reports to develop species lists of food and non-food grasses and geophytes in renosterveld habitat. Failure load and tensile strength were determined in the field for leaves of food and non-food plants that were spatially available to the tortoises and present in relative abundance during the course of the study. Leaves of geophyte food plants were fleshy and succulent with a low failure load and tensile strength. Leaves of food plant grasses had significantly higher failure loads and tensile strengths compared to leaves of food plant geophytes. In non-food plants there was no significant difference in failure load between grasses and geophytes, but tensile strength was significantly higher in the grasses. Non-food plant grasses and geophytes overall had significantly higher failure load and tensile strength values than did food plants. Two non-food plants that overlapped in mechanical strength to the food plants either have toxic/unpalatable chemicals in high amounts or are recent invasive species to the renosterveld. Thus, these studies support the hypothesis that leaf biomechanical properties may be an important factor in determining the diet of the geometric tortoise and perhaps tortoises in general.
2003
Villanova Faculty Authorship
vudl:173961
African Zoology 39(2), 2004, 175-181.
en
dc.title_txt_mv Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
dc.creator_txt_mv Balsamo, Ronald.
Hofmeyr, Margaretha.
Henen, Brian.
Bauer, Aaron.
dc.description_txt_mv Food and non-food plant characteristics were studied for the geometric tortoise, Psammobates geometricus, to test the hypothesis that feeding preferences in tortoises may be influenced by the mechanical properties of plant leaves. Twelve focal feeding observations made between 8 October and 31 October 2002 were synthesized with literature reports to develop species lists of food and non-food grasses and geophytes in renosterveld habitat. Failure load and tensile strength were determined in the field for leaves of food and non-food plants that were spatially available to the tortoises and present in relative abundance during the course of the study. Leaves of geophyte food plants were fleshy and succulent with a low failure load and tensile strength. Leaves of food plant grasses had significantly higher failure loads and tensile strengths compared to leaves of food plant geophytes. In non-food plants there was no significant difference in failure load between grasses and geophytes, but tensile strength was significantly higher in the grasses. Non-food plant grasses and geophytes overall had significantly higher failure load and tensile strength values than did food plants. Two non-food plants that overlapped in mechanical strength to the food plants either have toxic/unpalatable chemicals in high amounts or are recent invasive species to the renosterveld. Thus, these studies support the hypothesis that leaf biomechanical properties may be an important factor in determining the diet of the geometric tortoise and perhaps tortoises in general.
dc.date_txt_mv 2003
dc.format_txt_mv Villanova Faculty Authorship
dc.identifier_txt_mv vudl:173961
dc.source_txt_mv African Zoology 39(2), 2004, 175-181.
dc.language_txt_mv en
author Balsamo, Ronald.
Hofmeyr, Margaretha.
Henen, Brian.
Bauer, Aaron.
spellingShingle Balsamo, Ronald.
Hofmeyr, Margaretha.
Henen, Brian.
Bauer, Aaron.
Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
author_facet Balsamo, Ronald.
Hofmeyr, Margaretha.
Henen, Brian.
Bauer, Aaron.
dc_source_str_mv African Zoology 39(2), 2004, 175-181.
format Villanova Faculty Authorship
author_sort Balsamo, Ronald.
dc_date_str 2003
dc_title_str Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
description Food and non-food plant characteristics were studied for the geometric tortoise, Psammobates geometricus, to test the hypothesis that feeding preferences in tortoises may be influenced by the mechanical properties of plant leaves. Twelve focal feeding observations made between 8 October and 31 October 2002 were synthesized with literature reports to develop species lists of food and non-food grasses and geophytes in renosterveld habitat. Failure load and tensile strength were determined in the field for leaves of food and non-food plants that were spatially available to the tortoises and present in relative abundance during the course of the study. Leaves of geophyte food plants were fleshy and succulent with a low failure load and tensile strength. Leaves of food plant grasses had significantly higher failure loads and tensile strengths compared to leaves of food plant geophytes. In non-food plants there was no significant difference in failure load between grasses and geophytes, but tensile strength was significantly higher in the grasses. Non-food plant grasses and geophytes overall had significantly higher failure load and tensile strength values than did food plants. Two non-food plants that overlapped in mechanical strength to the food plants either have toxic/unpalatable chemicals in high amounts or are recent invasive species to the renosterveld. Thus, these studies support the hypothesis that leaf biomechanical properties may be an important factor in determining the diet of the geometric tortoise and perhaps tortoises in general.
title Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
title_full Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
title_fullStr Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
title_full_unstemmed Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
title_short Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
title_sort leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise psammobates geometricus.
publishDate 2003
normalized_sort_date 2003-01-01T00:00:00Z
language English
collection_title_sort_str leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise psammobates geometricus.
fgs.createdDate_txt_mv 2013-01-22T03:20:07.613Z
fgs.createdBy_txt_mv fedoraAdmin
fgs.type_txt_mv http://www.w3.org/ns/ldp#BasicContainer
http://www.w3.org/ns/ldp#Container
http://www.w3.org/ns/ldp#RDFSource
http://fedora.info/definitions/v4/repository#Resource
http://www.w3.org/ns/ldp#Resource
http://fedora.info/definitions/v4/repository#Container
relsext.isMemberOf_txt_mv http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8080/rest/vudl:173930
fgs.lastModifiedBy_txt_mv fedoraAdmin
fgs.ownerId_txt_mv diglibEditor
relsext.hasModel_txt_mv http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8080/rest/vudl-system:CollectionModel
http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8080/rest/vudl-system:CoreModel
http://hades.library.villanova.edu:8080/rest/vudl-system:ResourceCollection
relsext.sortOn_txt_mv title
fgs.state_txt_mv Active
relsext.itemID_txt_mv oai:digital.library.villanova.edu:vudl:173961
relsext.hasLegacyURL_txt_mv http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Villanova%20Digital%20Collection/Faculty%20Fulltext/Balsamo%20Ronald/BalsamoRonald-634af03a-77e1-4c7b-a9af-5103dde9ecd8.xml
fgs.lastModifiedDate_txt_mv 2021-04-12T19:02:25.169Z
fgs.label_txt_mv Leaf biomechanics as a potential tool to predict feeding preferences of the geometric tortoise Psammobates geometricus.
relsext.sequence_txt_mv vudl:173930#11
has_order_str no
agent.name_txt_mv Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University
klk
license.mdRef_str http://digital.library.villanova.edu/copyright.html
license_str protected
has_thumbnail_str true
THUMBNAIL_contentDigest_digest_str 203c69e18f4f46c81e9892448d2c07cd
first_indexed 2014-01-11T22:53:05Z
last_indexed 2021-04-12T19:11:45Z
_version_ 1755558194780831744
subpages